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FOUNDATION
FOR THE RIGHTS
OF FUTURE
GENERATIONS

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Newsletter 2007 PDF Print E-mail

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***************************************************************
Newsletter November 2007
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CONTENTS:
1.) 1st Reading of the Intergenerational Justice Bill in the German Bundestag
2.) Successful Award Ceremony/Symposium for the 1st Demography Prize for Young Scientists
3.) Current News on the Intergenerational Justice Prize 07/08
4.) New FRFG Study
5.) Become a member!
6.) Last but not least...

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1.) FIRST READING OF THE INTERGENERATIONAL JUSTICE BILL IN THE GERMAN BUNDESTAG
It is almost a year ago that 105 Representatives, aged between 24 and 64, introduced a bill for more intergenerational justice in the German constitution. On October 11, 2007, this bill was finally discussed for the first time in the Bundestag. In a vively debate, Representatives of the SPD, CDU/CSU, Greens and FDP spoke for the bill. However, other Representatives from the CDU and SPD warned of an overburdening of the constitution. The Representative from the "Post-Socialist Party" (PDS) spoke against the bill. Employees and friends of the FRFG were there to support the young Representatives with whom they had developed the bill. The bill was not voted upon, but referred to legal committee for expert hearings.
In this heated first reading Anna Lührmann (The Greens) countered the assertion of the PDS’s Sevim Dagdelen that the bill disvalued the contribution of the older generation and would lead to social decay with these words: "Generational justice is social justice in the future. Because who will suffer the most under the consequences of climate change? It will not be the rich who can buy themselves free of many problems. It is the poorer social classes in Europe and especially in Africa and Asia who will suffer under storms and the lack of drinking water and food. What applies for environmental policy applies also for state debt and for the social security systems. Politicians today can comfortably shift painful distribution conflicts on the future through implicit and explicit debts. It is however unjust, when we buy today’s social justice at the cost of tomorrow’s injustice." For more, read http://www.intergenerationaljustice.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=84&Itemid=114
To watch the debate was very inspiring, but the small resonance in the media is alarming. Short-term thinking is the biggest problem of our time. All democracies must reform themselves in order to be sustainable into the future. Such further developments of our democratic system should be dedicatedly discussed throughout the country. The only report on the first reading was however in the weekly newspaper Die Zeit (Nr. 43 from 18 October 2007, p. 9).

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2.) SUCCESSFUL AWARDS CEREMONY/SYMOSIUM FOR THE 1st DEMOGRAPHY PRIZE
Recently the FRFG awarded already for the fourth time one of its prizes, but this awards ceremony and symposium “Ways to More Children in Germany” was the most successful and smooth-running yet. It took place on November 11, 2007 in the Government Offices of Saxony in Berlin. There was a quite high number of participants—after 120 registrations the FRFG could accept no more. Because of very rainy weather some of these people did stay home, but the number was still much higher than former ceremonies. A reason for this was a cooperation with the Institute for Future Studies and Technology Assessment (IZT) and the Inforadio Berlin, who transmitted part of the seminar on the radio (listen at: http://www.inforadio.de/static/dyn2sta_article/843/215843_article.shtml). The celebration was opened by an amusing greeting by Michael Sagurna, a new minister in the Saxon Government. He emphasized that Saxony was the laboratory of Germany for demographic change because Saxony is going through today what will later happen in other German states. 
Next Prof. Dr. Reiner H. Dinkel, Chair of Demography and Econometrics at the University of Rostock, gave a keynote address on demographic research in Germany, especially concerning fertility. After a light lunch Prof. Dr. Ralf Ulrich from the Institute for Population and Health Research introduced the prize winners, who presented their works shortly. The 1st prize of 4000 Euro was given to Franziska Höring,  Jan Lemanski,  Stephan Schütze, Christoph Sperfeldt for their co-authored work “Changing Minds and Politics—Appeals for Sustainable Family Policy”. Wolfgang Gründiger won the 2nd prize of 2,500 Euro for his contribution “Dare for more Children—For an Active Birth Policy in Germany for a Better Demographic Future”. The contributions from both Inés Brock “Lack of Siblings and how Multi-Children Families can be Encouraged” and Annelene Wengler und Anne-Kristin Kuhnt “Children, Children, Children—Is a Rise in the Number of Children in Germany Even Possible?” were awarded the 3rd prize of 1,500 Euro. Susanne Mey received Honorable Mention for her contribution “The Crisis as a Chance for Change”. A total of 15 young scientists contributed works for the competition, and 61 asked for application materials. The prize was financed by the Apfelbaum Foundaton’s Learning Project for Co-Evolution and Integration.

On the whole this was a successful start for the idz, for whom this was the first public event and received a high level of recognition in the demography scene from the start. The complete documentation of the symposium is on our websites www.intergenerationaljustice.org.
 
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3.) CURRENT NEWS ON THE INTERGENERATIONENAL JUSTICE PRIZE 07/08
The Intergenerational Justice Prize 2007/2008 will be on the theme “Generation P—Unequal Treatment of Old and Young in the Workplace” (see Newsletter April 2007). Applications will be received until March 15, 2008 and up to this point 44 people have requested application materials, which can be asked for by e-mail. For more information on the Prize go to http://www.intergenerationaljustice.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=30&Itemid=54
Please note that contributions will also be accepted in English, and English-speaking applicants are heartily encouraged to participate. Furthermore there is a relatively high chance of winning as in the last competition almost half of the applicants received a prize.

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4.) “WHEN YOU COULD CHOOSE—WHEN WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE BORN?”
NEW FRFG STUDY ON PREFFERED BIRTH YEAR
Humanity now finds itself in an historically unique condition in which for the first time a switch of the positive historical trend of a growing HDI seems possible. Worldwide environmental problems like climate change, progressive degradation of the ozone layer and increasing pollution of the oceans lead to the question of whether future generations will have a better foundation for living than past ones. Human technological capability places us in the position to be able to irreversibly damage ourselves and the planet.
However it is a subjective judgement whether one believes that the future will be better or worse than the present. The study describes the empirical results received when the participants were allowed to freely chose a birth year. The Rawlsian Veil of Ignorance is applied here in an intertemporal and intergenerational context. The question of preferred birth year is posed with the following thinking: if the majority of respondents choose a year in the future, it shows that living in the future is seen as having at least the same degree of wellbeing as today. If the hypothetical birth year is however in the past, it means that the respondents see the No one elected a birth year prior to present/future as having worse living conditions than the past.
Most people chose a year in the vicinity of their real birth year, a considerable share placed their preferred birth year in the future. No one elected a birth year prior to 1895. The reasons given were inferior medicine and technology, less chance and opportunity, more wars, conflicts and suffering, superstition and low-grade education. To the study: http://www.generationengerechtigkeit.de/images/stories/Publikationen/artikel_studien/studie2_2007_final.pdf
(in German, currently being translated into English)

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5.) BECOME A MEMBER
"People can roughly be divided into three categories: the few, who make something happen…, the many, who observe how something happens…, and the overwhelming majority, who have no idea what happens at all." (Karl Weinhofer, born in 1942, German politician)

Please act for intergenerational justice and become a member of the FRFG. By so doing you can secure our financial basis and thus our independence! Membership allows you to enjoy extensive rights in the foundation. You are encouraged to offer ideas, suggestions, and to organize activities to achieve the aim of intergenerational justice. Find out more:
http://www.intergenerationaljustice.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=98&Itemid=133

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6.) LAST BUT NOT LEAST...
If you send us your postal address, you will receive a copy of the magazine "Intergenerational Justice Review" – of course as a non-binding sample.

Please feel free to contact us with any feedback concerning our newsletter.

With best regards,

The Editors

Foundation for the Rights of Future Generations
(Stiftung fuer die Rechte zukuenftiger Generationen)
Postfach 5115
D-61422 Oberursel
Tel: +49-(0) 61 71 - 98 23 67
Fax: +49-(0) 61 71 - 95 25 66
E-Mail: kontakt(at)srzg.de
Homepage: www.srzg.de
---
Board of Directors:
Dr. Joerg Tremmel (chairman)
Dr. Laura Tremmel
Adrian Schell
Tobias Kemnitzer
Frank Schmilowski
---
Board of Trustees:
Prof. Dr. Rolf Kreibich (chairman)
Prof. Dr. Ortwin Renn
Prof. Dr. Dr. Franz-Josef Radermacher
Dr. Juergen Borchert
Dr. Martin Thunert
Anna Luehrmann, MdB
----
Copyright © 2007 SRzG

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Newsletter September 2007
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CONTENTS:
1.) Demography Prize 2007: Latest News
2.) Intergenerational Justice Award 2008: Latest News
3.) New Book (in English): >Demographic Change and Intergenerational Justice<
4.) New Book (in German): >Wahlrecht ohne Altersgrenze? (Voting rights without age limits? – Considerations with regard to constitutional law, theory of democracy and psychological development of minors)<
5.) 25th issue of the Intergenerational Justice Review; subject: “What is justice? What is intergenerational justice?<
6.) Last but not least...

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1.) DEMOGRAPHY PRIZE 2007: LATEST NEWS
The Foundation for the Rights of Future Generations (FRFG) issues a biyearly Demography Prize for Young Scientists (donated with 10000 Euros) which treats topics like >Ways to more children in a liberal society<, >Positive effects of shrinking and ageing< or >Migration<.
Since August 25th, the jury finished the evaluation of the handed-in papers of the first round of the Demography Award concerning “Ways to more children in Germany within a liberal society”. The seven most excellent papers were prepared for the second round and handed over to the jury for a second evaluation. It will be completed on September 22nd. In a phone conference in the following week the members of the jury will have to agree on the positioning of the papers and the distribution of the prize money. From October the 1st the chosen laureates will be informed and invited to the award ceremony. The ceremony will be held during the Symposium „Ways to more children in Germany“, which will take place in the Government Office of the State of Sachsen in Berlin on November 9th. Location: Brüderstraße 11-12, 10178 Berlin.

Speakers at the symposium:
-    Hermann Winkler, (Head of the Governor’s Office of the State of Sachsen)
-    Prof. Dr. Reiner H. Dinkel, (Faculty of Economic and Social Sciences, Chair of Demography and Econometrics, University of Rostock)
-    Prof. Dr. Ralf Ulrich, (Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Bielefeld)
-    Prof. Dr. Dr. Helmut Schneider, (Research Institute for family-friendly employee policy , University of Münster/ Steinbeis-Hochschule Berlin)
-    Dr. Harald Michel, (Institute for Applied Demography,  Berlin)
-    Malte Ristau-Winkler, (Head of the Department of Family, Welfare and Social Citizenship of the Federal Ministry of Family, Women, Youth and the Elderly)
-    Dr. Joerg Tremmel, Founder of FRFG

It is likely that Federal German Minister of Transport, Wolfgang Tiefensee, will hold the opening speech as patron of the Prize. There will be arrangements made for light meals and drinks. You can register by sending a mail to kontakt(at)srzg.de. More detailed information can be found under www.intergenerationaljustice.org/

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2.) INTERGENERATIONAL JUSTICE AWARD 2008: LATEST NEWS
The Intergenerational Justice Award 2007/08 will be issued for the topic ““Generation ‘P’ – The unequal treatment of the old and the young in the workplace”. Intermediate result: Additionally to the foundation Apfelbaum, which had the idea for the prize and funds the prize money there was be found a second sponsor for the prize: Bionade. Other business companies and institutions have been addressed as well. As soon as the posters are printed, they will be sent to approximately 100 academic departments in order to reach various young scientists. Members of the Jury of this year’s award are Prof. Dr. Holger Luczak, Prof. Dr. Ekkehart Frieling, Prof. Dr. Ute Klammer, Dr. Beate Beermann, Ann Mettler und Prof. Dr. Klaus Dörre. From this year on, German and English submissions are possible; we aim to double the number of handed in papers. You can request the documents via email (kontakt(at)srzg.de). For more information on the award please use this link: http://www.intergenerationaljustice.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=30&Itemid=54


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3.) NEW BOOK (IN ENGLISH): >DEMOGRAPHIC CHANGE AND INTERGENERATIONAL JUSTICE<
This interdisciplinary anthology is composed of five sections. The first one provides detailed information on the demographic changes on a global and national level. Special attention is given to the future position of Europe in this changing global context. The second section examines the impact of demographic change on key sustainability indicators in certain areas of interest such as public debt, retirement systems, competitiveness, environment, the labor market and the education system in more detail. In the third section, we ask how intergenerational justice is affected if sustainability indicators change due to demographic change. The fourth section addresses the ethical legitimacy of population policies. It pursues the question whether we should seize the chance of influencing our descendents’ well-being if we are given the chance to do so. The fifth and truly innovative section of the book addresses the issue of institutionalizing our responsibility for future generations. Democracies face a structural problem, namely the tendency to prefer the present and to forget future implications of present decisions. To work toward a solution for this problem, the framework for a fair, future-orientated generational political system could be mended by an institutional establishment of generational justice.
This book is marked by its interdisciplinary approach and flexibility to look at current societal problems from many directions at once. Not only do the authors come from a multitude of fields and perspectives, but the contributions address not only the typical problems of economic policy, but look also at environmental, societal and philosophical issues.
Publisher: Springer; Publishing Date: January 2008
http://www.intergenerationaljustice.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=139&Itemid=197


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4.) NEW BOOK (IN GERMAN): >WAHLRECHT OHNE ALTERSGRENZE? (VOTING RIGHTS WITHOUT AGE LIMITS? – CONSIDERATIONS WITH REGARD TO CONSTITUTIONAL LAW, THEORY OF DEMOCRACY AND PSYCHOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT OF MINORS)<
Our anthology called “Wahlrecht ohne Altersgrenze” is ready to be printed by now. At the moment we seek financial support for the printing costs (a.o. VG Wort) and hope to publish the book soon. It will be published in the renowned Oekom publishing house and present the current positions to the subject from an interdisciplinary perspective. A lot of famous scholars including Dr. Hoffmann-Lange, Prof. Dr. Oerter, Prof. Dr. Heußner, Dr. Wolf¬gang Gaiser, Dr. Tim Krieger and Dr. Jörg Tremmel made a contribution to create a unique anthology in Germany.

The former Senator of Justice Dr. Peschel-Gutzeit writes in a review about the anthology:

“What nobody thought possible in the past ten years, came to be in the year 2004: The Federal Diet of Germany discussed about an interfactional claim to introduce an “electoral law by birth”. As a result the topic appeared on the public agenda. Despite of the big response from the public, it still exists no standard work on the subject. This gap is now filled by the anthology of the Foundation for Intergenerational Justice.”

Publisher: oekom; Publishing Date: January 2008

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5.) 25th ISSUE OF THE INTERGENERATIONAL JUSTICE REVIEW; SUBJECT: „WHAT IS JUSTICE? WHAT IS INTERGENERATIONAL JUSTICE?“
The issue 4/2007 of the journal Intergenerational Justice Review (release: December 2007) will deal with the subject: “What is justice? What is intergenerational justice?”. Authors from the philosophical and sociological field of justice research are invited to introduce their ideas of justice and to put them – if possible – to the intergenerational context. The articles include contributions from Prof. Dr. Otfried Hoeffe, Prof. Dr. Dr. Peter Koller, Dr. Axel Boh¬meyer, Prof. Dr. Ulrich Steinvorth and Dr. Jörg Tremmel/Oliver Goetz. The magazine will be published in German (December 2007) and English (March 2008).

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6.) LAST BUT NOT LEAST...
As always… Please feed us with emails from people that are interested in intergenerational justice. Before we add you to our mailing list, we would like to ask you, if you agree on receiving our monthly digital FRFG-Newsletter. If you send us the postal addresses of the prospects, you will receive these two copies of the Intergenerational Justice Review – of course as a non-binding sample.

Please feel free to contact us at any time to let us know when you have any feedback concerning our newsletter.

With best regards,

the editors of this newsletter

Foundation for the Rights of Future Generations
Stiftung fuer die Rechte zukuenftiger Generationen
Postfach 5115
D-61422 Oberursel
Tel: +49-(0) 61 71 - 98 23 67
Fax: +49-(0) 61 71 - 95 25 66
E-Mail: kontakt(at)srzg.de
Homepage: www.srzg.de
---
board of management:
Dr. Joerg Tremmel (chairman)
Dr. Laura Tremmel
Adrian Schell
Tobias Kemnitzer
Frank Schmilowski
---
board of trustees:
Prof. Dr. Rolf Kreibich (chairman)
Prof. Dr. Ortwin Renn
Prof. Dr. Dr. Franz-Josef Radermacher
Dr. Juergen Borchert
Dr. Martin Thunert
Anna Luehrmann, MdB
----
Copyright © 2007 SRzG

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Newsletter July 2007
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CONTENTS:

1.) Amendment to the German Constitution in favour of more intergenerational justice: the Parlamentarian debate will probably take place in September 2007
2.) Disappointing judgement of German Constitutional Court about state indebtedness
3.) New website of FRFG: www.intergenerationaljustice.org
4.) Symposium and award ceremony of the Demography Prize for Young Scientists in Berlin, on November 9, 2007
5.) Issue of the new magazine; its main subject: ‘Increasing the birth rate in Germany’.
6.) How to become a member
7.) Last but not least…
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1.) AMENDMENT OF THE BASIC CONSTITUTIONAL LAW IN FAVOUR OF MORE GENERATIONAL JUSTICE >> THE READING WILL PROBABLY TAKE PLACE IN SEPTEMBER

On November 10th in 2006, more than 100 members of the Bundestag introduced a draft bill for intergenerational justice in the German Constitution.
In the run-up, young MPs have worked three years together with FRFG on the phrasing of the draft bill. As the FRFG has learned from the young members of the Bundestag, the petition is to be discussed in September 2007, at a time of the day during which the parliament will be fully occupied.
Why hasn’t anything happened since last year? This is an impressive example of how democracy works. In fact, bills have to be handled during the term of six months after they have been tabeled.
But the young applicants did not insist on this, because then the petition might have been put low on the agenda, i.e. it would have been concluded without any public during night-time. Whether a petition is going to be handled by night or during >office hours< in the day time is being decided by the parliamentary directors - in this process, each party has the right to influence the agenda according to its size. Here, many groups of representatives often depend on the goodwill of their colleagues at the head of the faction. In addition to this, this petition is cross-factional and the small parties did not want to use up their little opportunities to interfere.
If the bill is finally adopted, Germany will join the group of countries that have enshrined the principles of sustainability and intergenerational justice in their constitution. If it fails, Germany continues to neglect the protection of posterity.

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2.) DISAPPOINTING JUDGEMENT OF THE FEDERAL CONSTITUTIONAL COURT ABOUT STATE INDEBTEDNESS
By the decision of the Federal Constitutional Court in Karlsruhe on 9. July 2007, an intergenerationally inequitable policy of state indebtedness was declared as conform to the constitution. The court refused the claim of the parliamentary groups of the conservatives (CDU/CSU) and the liberals (FDP) against the supplementary budget of 2004. In this budget, the new indebtedness clearly exceeded the new investments. In the reasons given for the judgment, there is a vague statement that new ‘mechanisms’ have to be found in order to settle the debts during several fiscal years but there are no concrete guidelines from the Federal Constitutional Court for the legislator.
Fortunately, three of the eight judges at the Federal Constitutional Court advance another view. They agree with the claim of many experts to re-define the term of >investment< in article 115 of the Basic Constitutional Law (GG). Investments should be cut by depreciation and amortization of fixed assets, bare replacement investments and gains out of privatisations. Consequently, the possibility of the government to incur new debt would be restricted.
Nonetheless, it has to be critically noted that this is not yet sufficient because the problem misdirected investments must also been considered. This could be done for example by a reduction of the amount of investment by one third, which has been proposed by the FRFG.
You find
- the reasons given for the judgment on:
http://www.bverfg.de/entscheidungen/fs20070709_2bvf000104.html
- the FRFG’s position paper about the reform of the state indebtedness on:
http://www.generationengerechtigkeit.de/images/stories/Publikationen/artikel_studien/studie_finanzielle_gg.pdf

An article of Prof. von Weizsaecker and Dr. Suessmuth about the problems of intergenerationally unfair net lending in the Handbook of Intergenerational Justice:
http://www.intergenerationaljustice.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=15&Itemid=49

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3.) NEW WEBSITE: WWW.INTERGENERATIONALJUSTICE.ORG
Our new English website www.intergenerationaljustice.org and the new German website www.generationengerechtigkeit.de are now online! They’re based on a content-management-system. The last step in the update process of our website will be to modify the other languages’ versions until mid-August. The French, Spanish, Czech and Polish websites will be completely renewed. You find all the other websites on http://www.srzg.de, by choosing the corresponding flag.
 
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4.) AWARD CEREMONY OF THE DEMOGRAPHY PRIZE FOR YOUNG SCIENTISTS IN BERLIN, NOVEMBER 9, 2007 >How to increase the birth rate in a liberal society?<
The Institute for a Better Demographic Future (idz) is linked to the Foundation for the Rights of Future Generations (FRFG). It is directed as a self-contained entity, although it is no legal person. Its main task is to research the complex coherences between demographic developments and intergenerational justice. For this purpose, the idz offers the demography prize for young scientists every two years, valued at 10 000€. In 2007, its subject matter is the increase of the birth rate; in 2009, it will be about the adaptation to shrinking and aging; and in 2011, the topic of the award will be migration (you’ll find more information on www.intergenerationaljustice.org  awards).
The first competition will last until august 1st 2007 - we have already received a lot of excellent papers, which will soon be presented to the jury.
The award ceremony will be held within the scope of our congress about ‘Increasing the birth rate in Germany – responsibility of companies, government and society’, which will take place in Berlin on November 9, 2007. Please do note down this event in your schedule; in the next newsletter you will receive an invitation.

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5.) ISSUE OF THE NEW MAGAZINE: >INCREASING THE BIRTH RATE IN A LIBERAL SOCIETY<
The issue 3/2007 of the magazine >Intergenerational Justice< (German version), which will be published in September, will mainly treat the subject of > How to increase the birth rate in a liberal society?<. There, you will find the shortened versions of the three or four top papers that have been handed in for the demography prize.
Further, the points of view of distinguished personalities of politics, science and business will be published.
Besides this emphasis, several books about durability, intergenerational justice and demography will be reviewed. In the issue to come, you will find reviews about “Theorien Internationaler Migration” by Petrus Han, “Die Mutterglück-Falle. Warum wir unser Familienbild ändern müssen” by Karin Deckenbach and “Weniger sind mehr” by Karl Otto Hondrich.

***************************************************************************6.) HOW TO BECOME A MEMBER (FRIEND OF FRFG´S)
“You can divide humans into three rough categories: the few, who make things happen…, the many who observe what’s going on from the outside… and the overwhelming majority without any idea what’s happening.” (Karl Weinhofer, geb. 1942, German politician)
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Members financially support the foundation, and allow it to function smoothly as an independent organization. Joining FRFG demonstrates your support of intergenerational justice and sustainability, and membership allows you to enjoy extensive rights in the foundation. You are encouraged to offer ideas, suggestions, and to organize activities to achieve the aim of intergenerational justice.
You have the right to:

- Receive the member's magazine "Intergenerational Justice Review" for free (in English or German).
- Partake in all public executive board meetings, SG meetings and other official meetings. At the annual committee meeting, each board member reports on the last year.

To join FRFG, click here to fill out the online form. You can determine your contribution, but there is a minimal contribution of 25 US-Dollars or Euro (as you prefer) for those less than thirty years old, and 50 $/€ for those above thirty. This fee covers the postage and various expenses accrued by individual membership. The membership is valid when the application form and contribution are received. Organizations are welcome to enjoy membership for 100 $/€ yearly. We look forward to welcoming you to FRFG!
For non-European members especially, it is possible to send your contribution by check instead of wire transfer. In this case please print our membership form and send it (made out to FRFG) per post to:
FRFG
P.O. Box 5115
61422 Oberursel
Germany
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7.) LAST BUT NOT LEAST
As always … Please tell us by sending an email to kontakt(at)srzg.de if you do not wish to receive this mailing, and we will take you immediately from our list. Additionally, if you know others who are interested in intergenerational justice, please send us their email addresses and they will receive our newsletter once every three months. If you send us the postal address of any interested parties, we will send them two samples of our magazine >Intergenerational Justice< free of charge and non-binding.

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In case you wish to support the FRFG, you will find more information about a membership on www.intergenerationaljustice.org.
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Here you can find PDF versions of our English editions of „Intergenerational Justice“
http://www.intergenerationaljustice.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=25&Itemid=46
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To unsubscribe to this newsletter, please send us an email at kontakt(at)srzg.de
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We are always pleased to receive your news, views and feedback.

Kind regards,

The E-Newsletter Editors

Foundation for the Rights of Future Generations
P.O. Box 5115
D-61422 Oberursel
Tel: +49-(0) 61 71 - 98 23 67
Fax: +49-(0) 61 71 - 95 25 66
E-Mail: kontakt(at)srzg.de
Homepage: www.intergenerationaljustice.org
---
Board of Directors
Dr. Joerg Tremmel (Chair)
Dr. Laura Tremmel
Adrian Schell
Tobias Kemnitzer
Frank Schmilowski
---
Board of Trustees:
Prof. Dr. Rolf Kreibich (Chair)
Prof. Dr. Ortwin Renn
Prof. Dr. Dr. Franz-Josef Radermacher
Dr. Juergen Borchert
Dr. Martin Thunert
Anna Luehrmann
----
Copyright © 2007 SRzG

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Newsletter April 2007

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CONTENTS

1) Intergenerational Justice Prize 2007/2008: >Generation ‘P’ – The unequal treatment of the old and the young in the workplace<

2) Call for Papers for the Anthology >Demographic Change and Intergenerational Justice<

3) Publication of the German–Spanish Edition of the magazine >Intergenerational Justice<: The Debate on sustainable Development in Spain.

4) Preview of Edition 23 of the Magazine >Intergenerational Justice<: Societal Generations and the example of the generation of 89.

5) Introducing our new book >Voting rights without an age restriction<

6) Introducing the new Schools project: >The Future is ours<

7) Appeal for renewable energy

8) The new English website goes live

9) Apply now for >Canada meets Germany<

10) Last but not least…. 

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1) INTERGENERATIONAL JUSTICE PRIZE 2007/2008: GENERATION ‘P’ – THE UNEQUAL TREATMENT OF THE OLD AND THE YOUNG IN THE WORKPLACE

Generation P’ can stand for ‘Precarious’, or the German word for interns, ‘Praktikanten’. The idea behind it remains the same whatever it stands for: It describes a generation that instead of getting fixed employment after studying is forced to complete a number of badly paid internships. Increasingly, interns are being exploited as cheap labour because they are not covered by the regulatory hand of the public authorities and are badly informed about their rights. They have minimal legal protection, working long hours to try and prove themselves to possible future employers, but they can be fired with very little notice and for no given reason. A new precarious generation has emerged. The question is focused around three subtopics. Candidates should attempt question 1, either 2a, 2b or 2c and question 3. 1) Define “Intergenerational Justice” and “Just Wages” and address the relationship between the two.2a) Analyse legal and collective labour agreements regarding intergenerational justice in Germany b) Describe how the world of work is changing in general, and what effects this has on different generations,c) Compare situations facing the younger generation entering the world of work in Germany and at least one other country.3) Which solutions could be found on a social, corporate and individual level?The prize(s) will be awarded at an awards ceremony during a congress in June/July 2008.  More information: www.intergenerationaljustice.org -> Awards -> Intergenerational Justice Award 2007/2008 

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2) CALL FOR PAPERS FOR THE ANTHOLOGY >DEMOGRAPHIC CHANGE AND INTERGENERATIONAL JUSTICE<

Intergenerational justice and demographic change are intimately linked because it is the size of a generation that determines a great share of its fate. But the rela¬tionship between intergenerational justice and demographic change is complex. The book aims at clarifying the impact of demographic changes on sustainability indicators that are relevant for intergenerational justice: environment, public debt, retirement sys¬tems, a competitive labour market, educa¬tion system etc. Until now no comprehensive and well-edited book analyzing this relationship has been available. The anthology is aimed at politicians, schol¬ars, experts, and any interested members of the general public. Currently two publishing houses are interested publishing the book. The Springer-Verlag (www.springer.com), one of the biggest science publishers in Europe, and Earthscan (www.earthscan.co.uk), one of the leading publishers in Sustainable Development.  For more information please consult our website www.intergenerationjustice.org. If you want to contribute to the book, please send a one-page abstract of your possible contribution to Dr. Joerg Tremmel at joerg.tremmel(at)srzg.de

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3) EDITION 22 OF >INTERGENERATIONAL JUSTICE< IN GERMAN AND SPANISH. >THE DEBATE ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN SPAIN<

Sustainable development is a global issue, which makes it surprising that there is little international exchange of research into sustainability. This magazine seeks to address this issue, marking only the first step on a long path. It is important to start an international debate about sustainability, to enable problems to be solved. Whilst solutions created in the English-speaking world are often instituted in other countries, there is very little interexchange of ideas directly between countries who do not speak English. Communication between these countries often only follows after an English translation has been made, a step we have skipped in this magazine. Members of the FRFG will receive this magazine by the end of the month. You can also find a digital version online on www.intergenerationaljustice.org -> Publications -> Intergenerational Justice Review  

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4) PREVIEW OF EDITION 23 OF THE MAGAZINE >INTERGENERATIONAL JUSTICE<: SOCIETAL GENERATIONS AND THE EXAMPLE OF THE GENERATION OF ‘89

In the early 90s there was a debate surrounding the then up-and-coming generation, which increasingly questioned the leadership of the older generations. But what happened to this generation? This magazine follows this generation from its “coming out” as a political generation until now. They were the first to recognise the emerging precariousness in the world of work for graduates, long before the term “Generation Praktikum” (Generation Internship) came into being. Given the current relevance of the latter term, it is interesting to follow a part of the lives of the generation who first noticed the trend of “Generation Praktikum”. This magazine presents historical, international and intergenerational comparisons, as well as theories and empirical studies. 

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5) INTRODUCING OUR NEW BOOK >VOTING RIGHTS WITHOUT AN AGE RESTRICTION<

About a fifth of the population - the children and teenagers - are kept out of political decisions. Against the background of the effects of today's level of state indebtedness, as well as the politics surrounding pensions and the environment, the question of whether these ‘lost voices' can be reactivated gains credibility, whether through voting rights without an age restriction or through voting by proxy. At the moment the interests of those not entitled to vote appear only on the periphery of politician's agendas, if they appear at all. The FRFG will  publish an anthology on this topic until summer. 

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6) INTRODUCING THE NEW SCHOOLS PROJECT >THE FUTURE IS OURS<

This project combines workshops in various local schools with a summer school at the FRFG. The aim is to stimulate the 14-16 year-olds from the area to think about their future, by introducing the subjects that will affect them: Intergenerational Justice, social justice, sustainability, insecurity in the workplace and the limits of the Earth. The students will be allowed to choose the focus of their workshop themselves by filling out a questionnaire beforehand, to ensure interest in the subject. The Summer school will then gather the most interested students together in order to show them how to make their interest count on a practical level. 

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7) APPEAL FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY

Energy sources can technically be switched to renewable energy- it IS do-able. And it’s possible within a much shorter timeframe than was previously thought possible, if politicians wanted to do it. The problem is that in order to protect certain interests, many decision-makers simply do not want to hear about it. We would like to point out that there is a lot left to do in the areas of sustainable energy and environmental policies. Everyone can help raise awareness of the problem, actively supporting the energy-switch to sustainable sources. If future generations could vote, our energy would come from sustainable sources within a few decades. But the future has no voice. The only hope is that today’s young generations, who will feel the effects of today’s shortsightedness in 60 years, will (together with committed members of the older generation) build up enough political pressure to realise an intergenerationally just energy system. 

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8) THE NEW ENGLISH WEBSITE GOES LIVE

Next week our new English website www.intergenerationaljustice.org will be making its first live appearance on the internet. Here you will be able to find up-to-date information about the FRFG and it’s activities. Give it a try! 

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9) APPLY NOW FOR >CANADA MEETS GERMANY<

>Canada Meets Germany< is an interdisciplinary network for young leaders and future innovators from Canada and Germany. The aim of CMG is to establish a solid and lasting basis for dialogue between the two countries in order to promote mutual understanding on a societal level.  CMG provides a framework for young, dedicated people from a variety of fields including economics, politics, academia, education, culture and the media to meet and exchange ideas. In August the programme will take place for the 5th time. You will find more information under www.canadameetsgermany.org – Apply today!

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10)  LAST BUT NOT LEAST

As always… Please tell us by sending an email to kontakt(at)srzg.de if you do not wish to receive this mailing, and we will take you immediately from our list.Additionally, if you know others who are interested in intergenerational justice, please send us their email addresses and they will receive our newsletter once every three months. If you send us the postal address of any interested parties, we will send them two samples of our magazine >Intergenerational Justice< free of charge and non-binding. 

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Here you can find PDF versions of our English editions of >Intergenerational Justice< at: http://www.intergenerationaljustice.org/images/stories/publications/ijr_3_2005.pdf

To unsubscribe to this newsletter, just click on the button >unsubscribe< on www.intergenerationaljustice.org--

 

--We are always please to receive your news, views and feedback. 
Kind regards, The E-Newsletter Editors 

Foundation for the Rights of Future Generations
P.O. Box 5115
D-61422 Oberursel
Tel: +49-(0) 61 71 - 98 23 67
Fax: +49-(0) 61 71 - 95 25 66
E-Mail: kontakt(at)srzg.de
Homepage: www.intergenerationaljustice.org
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Board of Directors:
Dr. Joerg Tremmel (Chair)
Dr. Laura Tremmel
Adrian Schell
Tobias Kemnitzer
Frank Schmilowski
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Board of Trustees:
Prof. Dr. Rolf Kreibich (Chair)
Prof. Dr. Ortwin Renn
Prof. Dr. Dr. Franz-Josef Radermacher
Dr. Juergen Borchert
Dr. Martin Thunert
Anna Luehrmann
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Copyright © 2007 SRzG